Posted in dental health, Gum disease, gum lifts, Life Hacks, Office News, oral hygiene, Periodontist in Virginia Beach

A History of Gum Disease

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Gum Disease is a condition that is not new to many of us; whether it’s gingivitis, or the later stages of advanced periodontitis, most people have experienced words of caution from their dentist and plans for either prevention or halting progression. Periodontal disease is related to bacteria and plaque/tartar buildup in the mouth, and none of these are recent developments. So if our ancestors did suffer from gum disease – how was it resolved prior to modern medicine? There are some geographical variations to be considered when you note that populations spread around the globe had no means (or motivation) to spread their medical discoveries with one another. We will use the examples of ancient Egypt and Japan to explore just a few ways periodontal disease was found and treated before modern medical discoveries.

In ancient Egypt, as an example, modern researchers have a lot of material they can analyze, due to their burial practices that aimed to preserve their remains. Chronic periodontal disease, as it happens, was similarly pervasive in ancient times as we find it today; however, the causes were both similar and different. While gum disease is ultimately caused by the same bacteria and buildup, in ancient Egypt the culprit for was likely nutritional deficiencies caused by periods of famine and drought, which are less prevalent today, though certainly not absent (Forshaw). Evidence suggests their medical knowledge to treat the ensuing diseases was limited, and primarily limited to topical preparations or mouthwash applied to the diseased tissues for short-term relief, rather than long-term treatment. It also appears treatment was targeted toward reducing tooth mobility, rather than addressing the root of the issue.

Turning our attention to another part of the world, there can be significant evidence found from remains in Japan, from a period cited as around 14,500 BC to 12,000 BC. In these ancient peoples there is a significant presence of bone resorption found in older individuals, indicating the presence of periodontal disease. However in this time period (nearly 16,000 years ago!) ‘older individuals’ could refer to some no older than the age of 15. More interestingly yet, 15 year olds could show the same signs of periodontal advancement that we would not see for 20-30 more years in modern populations; it is suggested that this is due to aging faster as a consequence of the physical stresses of their time that we are not accustomed to today (Fujita). Many times, these diseases went untreated due to the infeasibility of extractions or other corrective measures.

There are few conclusions to be drawn from this information, but it certainly is interesting to learn the ways we compare and differ to our predecessors! It is, however, safe to say that a great number of variables play into the prevalence rates of periodontal disease, as well as how that disease is treated. We can also safely acknowledge that we are fortunate to live in a world where we not only understand the causes and stages of gum disease, as well as how to provide efficient treatment to minimize damage and pain. Certainly a few things to think about the next time we are considering skipping the floss (:

Rod M. Rogge, DDS
762 Independence Blvd., Ste. 500
Virginia Beach, VA 23455
(757) 333-7444

Forshaw, R.J. "Dental Health and Disease in Ancient Egypt." Nature.com. Nature Publishing Group, 25 Apr. 2009. Web.

Hisashi Fujita (2012). Periodontal Diseases in Anthropology, Periodontal Diseases - A Clinician's Guide, Dr. Jane Manakil (Ed.), ISBN: 978-953-307-818-2, InTech. Web.
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Posted in dental health, gum lifts, Office News, oral hygiene, Periodontist in Virginia Beach

Gum Lifts

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The health of your teeth is always our priority, but so is your happiness when it comes to their appearance. There are many causes cited by patients who are unhappy with their smile, and there are an equal number of solutions we can offer to get you where you want to be. Many people immediately think of crooked or stained teeth when it comes to aesthetic issues with their smile, but have you ever considered that your gums could be the culprit?

It is not uncommon for gum tissue to cover too much of the teeth, or be over-exposed when smiling. These issues, sometimes known as a ‘gummy smile’, can cause tremendous insecurities and are easily remedied with a simple gum lift procedure. Additionally, a gum lift may become a necessary complementary procedure done in conjunction with another; for example, a patient desiring Veneers may require a gum lift before they can be effectively placed. These two procedures done together can breathe new life into your smile, and provide you with results that are truly incredible.

On a functional level, gum lifts may also be recommended for the health of your smile, rather than the looks. In the same way that gums can be raised to cosmetically enhance your smile, they can also be lowered to combat receding gums or other damage that can occur with gum disease. Receded gums can increase the ability of bacteria to infiltrate your gum line and compromise the integrity of your tooth. Treating these issues will often provide an improved first line of defense, coupled with consistent and thorough care from you.

The procedure itself is not complicated, and shouldn’t make you nervous.  Many patients are just fine and back to normal after only two days and some ibuprofen!

Dr. Rogge is located in Virginia Beach, and treats many patients from the surrounding communities of Norfolk, Pembroke, Chimney Hill, Windsor Woods, and Tidewater. If you believe you may be a good candidate for a gum lift, schedule a consultation and we will give you all the information you need to walk out of our office with your best and brightest smile yet!

Rod M. Rogge, DDS

762 Independence Blvd., Ste. 500
Virginia Beach, VA 23455
(757) 333-7444